Los Angeles (Reuters): An iconic superhero and one of the first comic book figures of the twentieth-century feminism, Wonder Woman has always deserved more representation than given.

More than 70 years after she first burst upon the scene in her red bustier and blue shorts, Wonder Woman is finally getting her turn in the movie spotlight, and expectations could hardly be higher.

"Wonder Woman," with the title role played by former Israeli army soldier Gal Gadot and out in movie theaters worldwide this week, is the first female superhero film since 2005’s box office dud “Elektra,” and the first to be directed by a woman.

"I feel it was a lot of expectation resting on the shoulders of this film and resting literally on the shoulders of Wonder Woman,” said director Patty Jenkins, whose budget was more than $150 million.

"We tried to make a movie for everybody a la the grand classic films from 'Superman 1' to 'Indiana Jones,' so I hope we actually get a little of everyone," she added, referring to hopes that both men and women would see the movie.

Since her inception in 1941 in DC comic books with her patriotic red bustier embossed with a golden eagle and blue shorts with white stars, Wonder Woman has become a symbol of female empowerment in a comic book world dominated by male superheroes like Batman, Superman and Iron Man, and by male fans.

Actress Lynda Carter became the embodiment of Wonder Woman when she played her in the highly popular 1970s television series.